Knee Therapy: Sports’ Best Kept Secret

One of the most common questions that I’m asked is:  “With a sports-related injury, when do I use ice and when should I apply heat?”

ICE THERAPY the best kept secret in sports medicine, period!

All the fancy machines and cool rehab techniques may get all the hype.  But if you ask the elite athletes with a knee injury what helps them maintain their body and assist their recovery the most, they will tell you that some form of ice therapy is vital.

Personally, my best training partners when it comes to athletic injuries is ice therapy.  I often use ice to help me control soft tissue pain and supercharge my recovery.

Knee Surgery Recovery is Enhanced With Ice

Recovering from any type of knee surgery is not easy.  Unless you have the unique skill of a gymnast, you won’t be able to walk around on your hands all day.  With the painful and lengthy rehab work that needs to be done with most knee injuries, you’re creating additional swelling and pain in the joint on a daily basis.  Knee surgery recovery starts with pain control to allow you to increase your range of motion (ROM), increase your strength and to restore your function.  Ice therapy is the trick to making that happen as soon as you wake up from your surgery.

It’s not a coincidence most successful knee orthopedic surgeons apply a cold therapy device to their patient’s knees before they even leave the operating room!  What does that tell you?

Injury prevention is an important motivator for me as the founder of this website and I’m sure it is the same for you.  Ice therapy should become a part of your injury prevention plan.

There are many myths and questions in the battle of ice versus heat…so today I am going to shed some light on the truth about ice.  I’ll discuss the benefits of heat therapy in upcoming blog writings.

How to Use Ice in Knee Therapy

Three Benefits of Ice

  1. It’s a lot easier to keep a joint from swelling than it is to reduce the swelling of an inflamed injury.
  2. Icing will quickly relieve knee pain by blocking pain receptors’ feedback to the brain.
  3. Ice will significantly minimize the likelihood that the injury will swell which can actually reduce your recovery time by 50%!

How Does Your Knee Respond to Ice?

  • It decreases inflammation.
  • It moderately reduces circulation to an area which will drastically decrease the rate of tissue swelling. (In contrast, applying heat to an acute injury is like turning on a drippy faucet.  It speeds up blood flow which can quickly INCREASE tissue swelling.)
  • It slows down the metabolism of the injury site which will reduce the body’s normal inflammatory process.
  • It decreases pain.

How Should I Include Ice in my Knee Therapy?

  • Ice the injury and the surrounding tissue, not just at the site of the injury.  For example, if your injury is on the right side of your knee, ice all the way around the knee instead of just on the injured side.
  • Try to ice the knee injury while elevating the body part.
  • Ideally ice with compression.

Methods of icing:

  • Submerge in ice water – the most aggressive and effective way to ice.
  • Ice Bags
  • Ice Massage
  • Frozen Vegetables

How Long Should I Ice My Knee?

  • Ice Massage – 10 minutes
  • Ice Bath, Ice Bag/Veggies – 15 minutes

Ice Massage Made Easy:

Fill a paper cup almost to the top with water and place in the freezer.  Once frozen, peel away most of the cup and massage with the exposed ice.

Common myths about icing

  • “Ice hurts.” Toughen up!  It’s not going to kill you.  Besides, you’ll get used to it.  To minimize your pain when icing the entire leg, keep the distal extremity being iced warm.  One way to do this is to put a rubber glove or bag over the toes when submerging the body part in ice.
  • “I might get frostbite.” The likelihood of frostbite is pretty rare–especially when you are only icing for 15 minutes or less.  However, if you have a circulatory pathology like diabetes or are being medically treated for chronically swollen extremities, consult your doctor before implementing this type of ice therapy.
  • “It’s been more than 72 hours since my injury, so it’s time to switch to heat?” If the injured area feels warm, it needs ice, regardless of the time frame.  So if the injury site feels warm and inflamed, apply ice, even if it’s been more than 72 hours.

The bottom line is simple:  If you want to stay active and continue to challenge yourself as an athlete, ICE THERAPY needs be included in your knee therapy plan.  If you’re pondering the eternal question: “To use ice or heat?”  ICE is always the safe selection.

Quad Strengthening to Prevent Knee Injuries

If you want to keep your knees happy, make your quadriceps (quads) a top priority.  The good news is this…the goal of having healthier and stronger quads may not be as difficult as you might think!

Leg strengthening and preventative knee care are of great concern for today’s athletes. Knee injuries represent approximately 51% of NFL injuries.  Similar percentages are found in most sports at every level of athletics.

If your objective is to prevent injuries, safe quad strengthening is a great place to start.

To create a new level of quad appreciation, you should better understand the muscle group. This will require a quick anatomy lesson.

Anatomy 101 – Your Quads

The word quad means “four” and that is based on the fact that you have four muscles that make up this muscle group located on the front of your thigh.

  1. Rectus Femoris
  2. Vastus Lateralis
  3. Vastus Medialis
  4. Vastus Intermedius

The Mighty Four
All four muscles’ distal insertions attach to the upper half of the patella or kneecap. The bottom part of the kneecap is connected to the patella tendon, which attaches to the upper front of the shinbone or tibia. Therefore, when the quads contract, they pull the patella in an upward direction, which extends the knee. This is exactly what happens when you run, jump, or kick a ball.

Injury Prevention and Performance Enhancement

The benefits of strong and lean quads are two-fold. First, they prevent injuries. The quads play a major role in protecting the knees in most athletic events.

Preventative sports medicine will help you stay on the field instead of spending your time at the doctor’s office or on the sidelines watching your friends having all the fun.

Secondly, a well-toned quad enhances your ability to perform. Whether it is in the gym or on a tennis court, stronger quads help you move more effectively with less pain.

There are many myths related to exercise. Your quads and knees are no exception. The exercise options for quad strengthening activities range from squats to free weights to lunges and box jumps, just to name a few. Here are some simple and proven tips that will safely and effectively give you the results you need.

Tips for Safe Quad Strengthening

  1. Leg extensions, presses and squats. Perform leg extensions, presses and squats within the knee range of 20 degrees from full extension to 90 degrees of flexion or bending.  This middle range is extremely effective if avoiding excessive compressive stress on the articular cartilage is your objective.
  2. Always stay in the pain free zone. If you experience pain during any exercise, decrease the motion to a pain-free range.
  3. Slow and controlled. Perform all movements in a slow and controlled manner.  If knee pain is experienced at any time during the exercise, assess the technique and/or the amount of weight being used.
  4. Short and sweet. Keep the rest phases between all sets and all exercises short.  You need to create the “burn” or fatigue of the quads in order to overload the muscles and accomplish muscle strengthening.

In summary, the strongest muscle group in your body is your quads and that is for good reason.

Newton’s Third Law

Did you know that Sir Isaac Newton’s mixed martial arts cage fighting career was cut short because of a quad strain?  Me neither…but if Mr. Newton was as smart as they say he was, I feel certain that he would have been a disciplined athlete who realized how important it is to take care of his quads.

Newton’s Third Law states: “For every action there is an equal and opposite reaction.” Therefore, when an athlete’s body comes in contact with the ground while running or a soccer ball when kicking, the body has to absorb that force and distribute that energy elsewhere.

When I watch our Jag players run, I am always amazed to see the amount of force and stress being applied to their knees by the reaction to both gravity and the ground. When a 330 lbs football player is running on grass, his foot is experiencing up to 2600 pounds per square inch of force. That’s seven to eight times his body weight!

You may be asking: “What does any of this have to do with injury prevention and my quads?” My answer? Everything.

The #1 shock-absorbing mechanism in your entire lower extremity is controlled lengthening of your quads. By implementing a safe and effective quad strengthening program, you will be well on your way to minimizing the likelihood of a knee injury and enhance your athletic performance.

I hope that you are as excited as I am about Mike Ryan Fitness and the amazing injury prevention and sports medicine tips that we can share to help YOU to stay healthy and happy!

Chondromalacia of the Patella Tendon

Chondromalacia, known as “Runner’s Knee”, is one of the most common sources of knee pain for athletes over 20 years old.  The patella injury involves the patellofemoral joint, where the patella (kneecap) and the femur (thigh bone) interact.

Chondromalacia is the pathology that takes place when the articular cartilage on the back of the kneecap becomes irregular and damaged.  Because the back of the patella is now not the smooth and firm surface it usually is, it can damage the distal femur articular cartilage surface.  Much like a damaged pulley, the stresses that are placed on the moving surfaces being loaded become a source of patella pain.

Healthy articulating surfaces in the human body, including the patellofemoral joint, have 3 times less resistance than a wet ice cube on ice!  Think about that for a minute. This simple yet amazingly efficient system of transferring forces over joint surfaces allows 400 pound men to run and jump with minimal damage to the joint…..until that articular cartilage becomes damaged.

The back of the patella has a medial (inner) facet and the lateral (outer) facet that both come into contact with the medial and lateral condyles on the distal femur bone.

What Happens When You Have Chondromalacia

In between the two facets is the intrafacet ridge which glides in the trohclea groove located between the medial and lateral condyles of the femur or thigh bone.  Patella injury can result in damage to any combination of these articular contacts or the patella tendon itself.

With activity, the patella may not glide or track in the proper manner with knee flexion and extension.  With abnormal motion, damage to the surrounding tissues and/or the cartilage on the underside of the patella or distal thigh bone can take place.

The vastus medialis muscle, the most distal and medial of the quad muscles, will usually become weak with any patella injury.  With this inner quad weakness and resulting tightening of the outer knee structures, the patella tends to shift too far laterally or to the outside.

Younger Athletes and Osgood Schlatters

With younger athletes who have not physically matured enough to close their growth plates, they are susceptible to Osgood Schlatter disease.  Osgood Schlatters is a condition where the insertion of the distal patella tendon is elevated.  It significantly changes the tracking and movements of the kneecap.  Because of the alterations with the wear patterns of the backside of the patella, excessive articular cartilage damage occurs and patella tendon quickly becomes symptomatic.

Signs and Symptoms of Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome

  • A visible (atrophy) and functional quadriceps weakness when compared bilateral.
  • May have discomfort/pain in the anywhere around the patella with prolonged sitting and activities involving resistive knee extension such as running and jumping.
  • May have a history of Osgood Schlatters disease or patella injury.
  • Swelling sometimes occurs after activity.
  • A palpable grinding/clicking sensation from behind the kneecap with leg extension that may or may not be accompanied by pain.
  • A Q-angle greater than 20 degrees.

Professional Treatment for Chondromalacia & Osgood Schlatters

  • A product like the Trigger Point Quadballer is a great therapy option to relax the quad and increase the knee range of motion
  • Biomechanical analysis to assess the lower extremities bilaterally to determine if there are specific mechanical issues that are contributing to the Chondromalacia.  Common factors are:
    • Leg length discrepancy
    • Poor flexibility
    • Excessive pronation or supination
    • Quad weakness
    • Weak abdominal musculature
  • Consistent use of rollers and massage to the entire thigh area including the lateral thigh, groin and hamstring muscles.
  • Implementing aggressive quad strengthening exercises that are pain-free with minimal patella crackling or noise present.  To accomplish this, the types of exercises, the specific range of motion and the amount of resistance must be closely monitored to safely improve strength without increasing the symptoms.
  • Full flexibility of the lower extremity and low back.  The hip flexors, the IT band, the calves and, believe it or not, the big toe are the most overlooked areas for athletes who are not successful in overcoming this patella injury.
  • Warming up the knees are often overlooked but it is priceless with this injury.
  • Aggressive manual therapy and modalities to decrease the pain while increasing the mobility of the soft tissue associated with the patella.
  • Ice, ice, ice….immediately after any activity.

Questions a Pro Athlete Would Ask about Chondromalacia

To ensure you are treated like a smart professional athlete with a patella injury or Chondromalacia who wants to safely return to his/her sport, you’ll want to ask your sports medicine specialist the following questions:

  1. Are you certain of the diagnosis?
  2. Do I need any other tests to determine the extent of this injury?
  3. How badly damaged is the cartilage on the back of my kneecap and are there any activities that I need to avoid as I rehab this injury?
  4. What are my options with treating this injury?
  5. What factors do you consider to be the main reasons for my injury and, more importantly, need to be addressed with my rehab?
  6. Quad Weakness
  7. Poor Flexibility
  8. My Sport(s)
    1. Who do you consider to be the expert patella rehab specialist in this area?
    2. Do you have a detailed rehabilitation protocol to direct my rehab for both my therapist and me?

Tips To Help You Heal And Reduce Knee Pain

  • Be Farsighted – Chondromalacia is often the result of a biomechanical problem that needs to be corrected.  Look above, below, behind and in front of the kneecap to find the source(s) for the pain..
  • Change Now & Stay the Course – Most factors for patella injuries don’t just go away.  Plan on finding the problem, making the necessary changes and then maintain those changes for the long haul.
  • Be Honest With Yourself – Look closely at your workouts for the past 3 months and ask:  “Did I change too much too soon?”  Increasing the workload too fast is a common problem with athletes suffering from acute patella injuries.
  • Ice is Your Friend – Here we go again…….Ice hurts but it’s exactly what you need for this injury.  The Pro’s will tell you that ice is their best teammate. You’ve heard me say this many times throughout MRF, however I can’t stress the importance enough. You need ICE and lots of it. Also, if you have a child with Osgood Schlatters, make sure he/she is icing properly.
  • Father Time Has a Bum Knee – As we age our flexibility naturally decreases unless we work at it.  Consistently maintaining out flexibility is the key while joining a yoga or Pilates class is the ideal solution.  Start stretching NOW and take a lot of stress off your knees, patellas and low back so you can make this patella pain a thing of the past.

How Professional Athletes Successfully Treat Knee ITB Syndrome

Iliotibial band syndrome (ITBS), or Illiotibial band tendonitis, is a frustrating and troubling injury.  Because of it’s common mechanism of injury involves repetitive knee flexion and extension, it is often associated with runners.

Personally, ITB syndrome has proved to be one of the most difficult injury that I’ve dealt with as an athlete.

The IT band is a sheath of dense fibrous connective tissue which originates on its upper end to the tensor fascia latae muscle on the upper outer thigh.  The ITB extends down the lateral thigh and inserts into the outer surfaces of both the fibula and tibia bones of the shin. The function of the IT band is to help extend the knee joint, externally rotating the upper leg along with abducting of the hip.

Illiotibial band tendonitis is usually a result of the ITB being inflamed with excess friction of the ITB passing over the lateral epicondyle (the bony ridge on the outer distal thigh bone) of the femur (thigh bone).  With a repetitive knee movement like running or secondary trauma, the rubbing of this tissue over the hard bony ridge will result in inflammation and movement discomfort.

Signs and Symptoms of Runner’s Knee/Iliotibial Band Syndrome

  • Pain on the outside of the knee above, at or below the lateral knee joint line.
  • An increased tenderness with palpation(note: palpation is a method of clinical examination using gentle pressure of the fingers to detect growths, changes and unusual tissue reactions)of the iliotibial band.
  • An inability to squat through a full range of motion because of lateral distal thigh pain and weakness.
  • Knee pain normally aggravated by running, particularly downhill.
  • Pain during flexion or extension of the knee with both the foot on and off the ground.

How to Professionally Treat Iliotibial Band Syndrome

  • Apply cold therapy with ice bags, ice massage or ice bath.
  • Rest the knee and lower extremity from running, quad strengthening and painful activities.
  • Implement self myofascial mobilization and massage techniques such as rolling the thigh, lateral thigh and calves.
  • Aggressive flexibility of the IT band and the entire lower extremity including the ankle, great toe and low back.
  • Lateral knee and thigh massage is an effective treatment to reduce painful ITB tightness.
  • Assessing leg length and foot biomechanics bilaterally.  It is common to trace the source of lateral knee pain to a leg length difference or excessive pronation involving one leg.(Pronation means that the feet roll inward and cause the ankles to turn in.)
  • A thorough analysis of the athlete’s training program

Asking the Right Questions With Lateral Knee Pain

When faced with runner’s knee or Illiotibial band tendonitis, the wise professional athlete who wants to safely return to his/her sport and avoid further injury will ask his sports medicine specialist the following questions:

  1. Are you certain of the diagnosis?
  2. Do I need an MRI to rule out any other problems?
  3. What are the best options with treating this injury?
  4. What can I expect with this injury for the next 2, 4 and 6 weeks?
  5. Who do you consider to be the expert knee rehab specialist in this area?
  6. Will I be given a detailed rehabilitation protocol to direct my rehab for both my therapist and me?

Tips For Successful Iliotibial Band Treatment

  • Minimize the Damage – Illiotibial Band Syndrome is not an injury that you can just grit your teeth and run through.  Be smart early and avoid creating additional injuries.
  • Look Elsewhere – IT band tendonitis is often a result of a mechanical problem elsewhere.  Look above: hip & low back…..or below:…arch, ankle or great toe.  Don’t forget to look at your shoes!
  • Ice is Your Friend – It’s a reality check:  Ice hurts but it’s exactly what you need for this injury.  The Pro’s will tell you that ice is their best teammate.  Stop complaining and do what you know you need….ICE and lots of it.
  • Lighten up, Coach! – An athlete suffering from IT Band Syndrome is usually training very hard.  A common theme with this injury is that you do not have enough recovery time during the week or you are progressing too aggressively with your workouts.  Getting your coach, which sometimes refers to YOU, to work with you on this is a key step in getting this painful injury in your rearview mirror. A thorough analysis of your athlete’s workout plan is a great start.
  • How Long? – This may be one of the toughest injuries to put a recovery timeframe on.  The downtime from lateral knee pain associated with IT Band Syndrome is significantly reduced if you treat the injury early and modify painful activities while treating the injury as noted above.

Osgood Schlatters: Managing Youth Patella Pain

He has this huge bump below his knee, his doctor says he’ll grow out of it but it hurts him all the time.  What should we do?’ his mother said, frustratingly seeking an answer.

Following a fund raising golf tournament recently a good friend of mine came to me looking for a clear answer for a strange injury with a bizarre name.  Her athletic teenager had an overly large bony lump just below his right knee.  He was 16 years old, still growing and she was understandingly concerned about her son’s knee.

Osgood Schlatters Disease is an orthopedic disorder that results in an enlarged tibial tuberosity just below the front of the knee.  The tibial tuberosity is the lower attachment of the patella tendon.  Because of the excessive forces generated by the quadriceps (muscles located in the front of the thigh) muscles, the load is transferred to the patella (kneecap) and directly to the tibial tubercle on the tibia (shin bone).

Patella injuries are usually a mechanical injury.  In a simplistic manner, when these muscles are contracted, the forces are applied to the tibial tuberosity and the knee is extended.  That’s the easy part.

A growth plate is typically a location at the end of most long bones.   At a growth plate, a cartilaginous ring allows for the growth of the bone.

Chondromalacia is commonly associated with many types of patella injuries.

Here comes the interesting part…..a growth plate is located at the tibial tuberosity.  Therefore, when an active teenager creates excessive forces at the knee with activities such as jumping, squatting, running, trauma,…etc., the rate and the direction of the growth at that tibial growth plate can easily be altered.  Hence, the bump gets larger and more painful.

Patella injuries are successful resolved when addressed promptly. With an early onset of Osgood Schlatters, if the young athlete rests the area for 2-4 weeks and avoids the specific sports activities that worsen his pain, his symptoms will resolve themselves.

Osgood Schlatters and chondromalacia are similar in the fact that when these conditions occur, the athlete is typically predisposed to having symptoms in the future.  With Osgood Schlatters, when the athlete stops growing and his growth plates mature or “close”, the athlete has much less problems with the injury other than the cosmetic appearance and mechanical issues of an enlarged tibial tubercle.

Suggestions to Alleviate Osgood Schlatters Pain

  1. See his doctor to clearly diagnose this problem and to “rule out the bad stuff.”
  2. Ice his knee after every workout and competition.
  3. Become a flexibility machine.  My advice on flexibility: start young and stick to it.
  4. Avoid aggressive leg strengthening exercises and agility work whenever possible.
  5. Rest the knees.  A little rest now will help him avoid missing large chunks of time later.

I think this young man will do well if he follows this advice.  The Osgood Schlatters will quiet down in time.  Meanwhile, the enlarged tibial tubercle will probably not return to its normal size.

As with most sports injuries, the earlier you address the problem the quicker they quiet down.  Being smart now will ensure that you will be active and healthy later!