5 1/2 Tips to Beat Bad Ankle Pain

bad ankle

Source: Pixabay

Too many of us live with daily ankle pain. Usually the factors creating ankle pain are often quite controllable and manageable with the right sports medicine advice.

Both athletes and non-athletes are susceptible to sore ankles, ankle sprains and chronic ankle pain. Controlling the pain and maintaining healthy ankles, feet, toes and calves is not difficult. I’m often asked for tips and suggestions on these body parts by individuals both young and old. Let me share with you the same tips I use on NFL players to help you live a fun and active lifestyle.

1.  Strengthen your Base of Support

Strong arches and toes are key to stabilizing everything above the feet. Any base of support, be it a building or a human body is vital to both stability and function. Simple exercises such as picking up marbles with your toes, barefoot walking/running, toe towel curls and  barefoot balance drills should be done on a daily Basis.

2.  The Right Shoes for Sprained Ankle

Wearing the proper shoe and, more importantly, not wearing the wrong shoe is vital if you want happy “dogs”. Women’s shoes are the best things to happen to pediatrics (foot doctors) because they consistently create ankle, feet and toe pain for women. Spending a little more money on the right shoe is money well spent if an active lifestyle is a priority of you.

3.  Warm-up/Cool Down for Running Ankle Pain

If there’s one thing I’ve learned about my body since I’ve turned 40 is that warming up and cooling down is important. In saying this, I realize it doesn’t require a lot of time to do so. The use of a roller, flexibility exercises, compression sleeves and ice has help me do this quickly and consistently.  Too often ice is not considered an important option for chronic ankle injuries.  That’s a mistake…ice therapy rocks and it should be considered to be one of your best friends!

4.  Embrace your Downward Dog

This could be your most important stretch. Last week I was doing a downward dog stretch in my living room at 4:15 AM when I was startled by the sight of my dog Marshall right next to me also doing a downward dog with me!

My Loyal Dog Marshall

It’s a great stretch that addresses muscle, tendons, joints and fascia from your toes through your arches, over your heels, through your calves, into the back of your knees, throughout your hamstrings, behind your hips and all though your low back…..just to name some of the locations.

5.  Self Traction and Mobilizations

These require more skill or may require the assistance of a friend although they are priceless for maintaining normal ankle mechanics. With the sore ankle at approximately 90° or a “neutral position”, gently pulling on both the heel and the top of the foot together.  This will create a gaping of the ankle from the lower shin. This can be accomplished with the help of an assistant or by placing the foot under a bed or couch to stabilize the foot and ankle.

Another mobilization move which is helpful to maintain the mechanics of a sprained ankle is to gently move or mobilize the lateral ankle bone both directly forward and more importantly directly backwards. This lateral ankle bone or lateral malleolus is a common source of a sore ankle.  Increasing its mobility is one of my favorite tricks to decreasing pain in a chronically sore ankle.

Bonus Tip –  Aggressively Directed Massage

If you really want to loosen up chronically stiff ligaments and muscle, aggressive massage should be included. Once a sore ankle, shin and arch are warmed up, apply a moderately aggressive massage with your thumbs to the locations around your ankle locations noted below.

Focus on the areas on both sides of the Achilles tendon that forms the backside of the ankle joint, the entire edge surfaces of the lateral ankle bone and the front of the ankle joint.  Including the arch and the great toe is always an added bonus. After these areas have been loosened up, it’s important to get all those moving parts active and functional to both normalize range of motion and to re-program the entire leg how to move pain-free.

2 replies
  1. Tiffany Locke
    Tiffany Locke says:

    Making sure you strengthen your arches and toes to stabilize your foot is a good idea. Taking care of your body and doing exercises to keep it in good shape is important. Going to a podiatrist if the pain in your foot or ankle stays the same, or gets worse, would probably be very important in finding out what is wrong as soon as possible so you can start to fix it.

    Reply
    • Mike Ryan
      Mike Ryan says:

      Good point Tiffany. Too many people limp too long before contact orthopedic and sports medicine specialists. Chronic injuries are harder to manage.

      Reply

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